Red Spotted Scat PDF Print E-mail
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General information – Scatophagus argus arromaculatus is a bronze

color with dark black spots covering the entire body. As the scat

matures, it takes on a humpback appearance and the spots on the

body become darker. The Scat can be found in estuaries and streams

where fresh and salt waters come together, and can even be found in

completely marine areas. Scats can be found in coastal waters from J

apan to Australia. A well cared Scat species can live between 10 and

20 years.There are more Scatophagus spices, called Scatophagus

argus (Green Scat), Scatophagus multifasciatus (Silver Scat), and

Scatophagus tetracanthus.

Common Name - Red Spotted Scat, Scat, Argusfish

Scientific Name - Scatophagus Argus Arromaculatus

Family - Scatophagidae

Red Spotted Scat
Photo by: Chief

Origin - Indo-Pacific.

Size – Reported up to 12 inches (30 cm), but usually quite a bit smaller in aquarium

First discovered - Linnaeus, 1766

Nutrition – Omnivorous, Eats litterly anything. Should be fed mainly vegetable-based foods with meaty

foods offered on occasion. Feed dried seaweed, lettuce, algae, a quality flake food, and occasionally

 brine shrimp oe mysis shrimp.

Behavior - Semi-aggressive towards its own kind, and is therefore best kept in a group of 5-6 or more,

to spread out the aggression. Generally ok with other similar sized brackish fishes, such as Monos,

Puffers, and Archer's. Avoid keeping the Scats with delicate fish.

Maintenance and care – The Scat requires an aquarium of at least 60 gallons with plenty of plants and

hiding places. Scats will require salt water as they grow. Young scats often raised in freshwater but they

usually do better in brackish then saltwater tanks. Gradual change from brackish to saltwater will

maximize the coloration and the health of the fish as it becomes older.

Water Parameters – Temperature: 73F-82F (23C-28C), PH: 7.5-8.5

Breeding - The differences between the sexes and their breeding habits are unknown, but breeding only

likely to occur in heavy brackish or marine conditions.

 

Profile by: Chief